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Photo credit: Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University

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Title: Vase, Red and Green Glass
Date: ca. 1900
Medium: Glass and metal
Dimensions: 6 1/4 x 4 1/2 inches (15.9 x 11.4 cm)
Credit Line: Gift of Isabel and William Berley, Classes of 1947 and 1945
Object Number: 99.078.126
Label Text: BRIEF DESCRIPTION
Koloman Moser designed this small round vase, which combines glass and metal work.

WHERE WAS IT MADE?
This vase was most likely made in Vienna, Austria.

WHO WAS THE ARTIST?
Koloman Moser (1868-1918) became fascinated by art at a young age in his father’s workshop. Moser was trained and also taught at the Kunstgewerbeschule. From there he broke from the establishment and in 1897 he co-founded the Vienna Secessionist movement, whose first president was Gustav Klimt. Starting his career as an illustrator, Moser went on to create ceramics, furniture, jewelry, fabric, and interior designs. In 1903 he co-founded the Wiener Werkstätte (Vienna Workshops), an arts workshop that influenced artists throughout Europe. During his final years, he devoted his time to painting.

HOW WAS IT MADE?
The vase is made from mold-blown glass that fades from a pale red color at the top to a light green at the base. The use of a mold results in a uniform and reproducible form.

WHY DOES IT LOOK LIKE THIS?
Notice how the metal neck of the vase features flared openwork ‘wings’ to either side with a green/blue cabochon placed in the center. The geometric forms in this vase are early signs of the Art Deco style that would become so popular later on in the 1920s and 30s. As the Arts and Crafts Movement and Art Nouveau style were in decline, artists like Moser began to use elements of the Art Deco style within their designs.

NOTE: This electronic record is compiled from historic documentation which may not reflect the Johnson Museum's complete or current knowledge of the object. Review and refinement of such records is ongoing.