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Photo credit: Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University

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Title: Ch'ullo [Chinchero hat of traditional design]
Medium: Acrylic yarn
Dimensions: 20 1/2 x 10 1/4 inches (52.1 x 26 cm)
Credit Line: Acquired through the museum Purchase Fund
Object Number: 92.054.002
Label Text: BRIEF DESCRIPTION
A chullo is a traditional Peruvian knitted man’s hat. Sometimes children wear them as well. Notice the multi colored bird like decorations on this hat. The edges around the bottom of the cap are scalloped and also multi colored.

WHERE WAS IT MADE?
This hat was made in Peru.

WHO IS THE ARTIST?
Nilda Callañaupa is a master Andean weaver and the Director of the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco, founded to preserve the textile heritage of the region. Nilda grew up in the valley of Chinchero, not far from Machu Picchu, and learned to weave from her grandmother. She began to spin yarn at age five and was weaving by age six. Her talents were recognized at a young age and by the age of 14, Nilda was giving weaving demonstrations at the Smithsonian at the Museum of Natural History. She graduated with a degree in tourism and opened the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco in 1996.

HOW WAS IT MADE?
This hat was knit by hand using five needles. The Spanish introduced knitting to the Andean region in the 1500s. Both women and men knit, but depending on the region, the activity can be exclusive to one or the other of the sexes. Although this hat is made with acrylic yarn, many chullos are made with the traditional wools available in Peru: Alpaca and Llama.

HOW WAS IT USED?
A chullo is a knitted hat that features flaps on the sides that cover the ears to provide warmth. The chullo is traditionally worn by people living in or traveling through the high regions of the Andes.

WHY DOES IT LOOK LIKE THIS?
A variety of colors and designs can be seen in Andean textiles. These designs vary from region to region and can be representational and/or abstract. The form of this hat is specific to the Chinchero region, a valley of Peru, and features rows of bird-like animals.

NOTE: This electronic record is compiled from historic documentation which may not reflect the Johnson Museum's complete or current knowledge of the object. Review and refinement of such records is ongoing.